An African Dreamer

Blessed to Be A Blessing

As I was preparing to send my children back to school last month, I cleared their school fees and observed that the supermarkets were full of parents pushing trolleys with their children. We were filling up our trolleys with all kinds of stuff from basic soap and shoe polish to cornflakes and milk that many very privileged children carry to school.

Today however I write from a point of pain. Whereas many of our children have the privilege of having their fees paid and school requirements bought, there are those that wish they could go to school. There are those who just sit on the sidelines and watch others study while they wish they could even just even go for one term. They imagine that education will sort all their problems and give them access to a better life.

In March last year I had an opportunity to visit a rural school in the Northern part of Uganda. I met the student leadership. Head boy, Head girl and their cabinet of prefects. I was impressed by their confidence and enthusiasm. We discussed their school life, home life and their ambitions. Most of these students came from very under privileged families. In fact, when I later spoke to the Headmaster he confessed that most of the student leaders were brilliant children who managed to woe their peers to elect them but unfortunately many hadn’t paid their fees and the school would only retain them until exam time. Once the exams ae near all students who haven’t paid fees are sent away.

Adam comes from a family of 8 children. He is the oldest child. His grandmother sent him to school hoping he will be able to help his siblings. He said his mother died and he wasn’t sure where his father is. He hopes to become a pilot and mentioned he had researched the schools available. Rose, a tall brilliant girl on the other had was going to sit her final exams and hopes to become a lawyer so she can prove that girls from her clan can be successful. These are the stories of just a few of the students I met. They were so many more. We had a fun afternoon sharing stories both good and bad and it ended with me giving them advice for them to read hard a pursue their dreams.

Unfortunately, that is the story for many Ugandan children who are enthusiastic to go to school and hope that the education will help them achieve their dreams.  For every 100 children that start primary school most will never join a tertiary institution. They drop out along the way and many times it is because their families cannot afford to pay for their education.

You are so blessed. The onus is on us, who are blessed to ensure we are a blessing to others. Sponsor a child, bless a family and give back to your society. If you are reading this, you are among the lucky few and even ten dollars from you can change the future of a child. Ten dollars from you can make their dream a reality and take them out of extreme poverty.

If you’re interested in sponsoring a student leader and helping them pursue their dreams, or mentoring or employing a youth, please connect with us and join us in this move to give opportunities to gifted, bright, talented but underprivileged students. These children will change the face of Africa and should be given the opportunity to. You are blessed to be a blessing – support an African dreamer!

Author: Ganda Life Planner

I believe life is a journey. You need to enjoy it and also do it well. I love to plan and later tick off what I have achieved. There are so many things we need to do in life; in our family, work place and neughbourhood. The Ganda Life Planner is my personal story of what has worked for me in all aspects of my life. I will be sharing with you my story and planning tools that you can borrow to help you achieve your dreams in all areas of your life. Hope you enjoy it.

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